The benefits of instructional conversations in student teacher relationships

Ditch the E-mail The convenience of e-mail is a double-edged sword. While we can asynchronously communicate thoughts to colleagues and reap all the benefits of electronic communication, we sacrifice that face-to-face contact. Relationships are best built face-to-face and side-by-side, but e-mail waters down the relational impact of our message.

The benefits of instructional conversations in student teacher relationships

Try to make an effort to call on students who have typically been off task or who have been achieving at a low level, allowing them to respond and participate in class, and watch what happens.

Over time, you will notice that these students will remain on task more often and improve academically! This change does not occur immediately, but it definitely does occur and is extremely gratifying to see. Latency is the amount of time that elapses between the moment you give a student a response opportunity and the moment you terminate the response opportunity.

Kerman and colleagues explain that the amount of time we give to students to answer questions is directly related to the level of expectation we have for them. We give more time to students when we have confidence in their ability to answer a question.

Conversely, we give less time to students in whom we have little confidence. When you quickly give up on a student who is struggling with a response, it is clear to everyone in the classroom that you don't expect him or her to come up with the right answer. What you will find when you make a conscious effort to extend the length of latency you allow for low-achieving students is that these students will begin to pay more attention, become more actively involved in discussions, and minimize their behavior issues.

One thing you can do is ask a teaching peer to observe your instruction and chart the length of the latency periods you are giving each student from the time you ask the question until you move on to another student. It is especially interesting to find out which students get longer latency periods from you.

Latency Chart in Seconds Paul Brown: In analyzing the chart, it is easy to see that Donna and Mary are consistently given more latency and, therefore, more chances to give a correct response than are the other students.

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If this were your classroom, you could try to make sure that in future discussions and question-and-answer periods you give longer latency periods to other students as well before moving on.

Give Hints and Clues to Help Students Answer Questions You also communicate positive expectations by giving hints and clues to your students. It is important that we communicate to all our students that we have high expectations for their success, and one way to do this is by giving more hints and clues to all students, especially the low-performing students.

Think about a reading lesson in which a student struggles to sound out a word. If you provide too many hints and clues, you may actually give the student the answer. Also, after a number of hints, it may be that the only student who doesn't know the answer is the one being called on, which ends up being an embarrassing experience.

By Edward Graham. Susan TerLouw takes a proactive approach to fostering collaboration with her students’ parents. “I have found texting to be an amazing way to get connected with parents,” says the high school special education teacher. Mentorship is a relationship in which a more experienced or more knowledgeable person helps to guide a less experienced or less knowledgeable person. The mentor may be older or younger than the person being mentored, but he or she must have a certain area of expertise. It is a learning and development partnership between someone with vast . The –17 ASCD Teacher Impact Grants (TIGs) provided funding and support directly to teachers for promising teacher-led, administrator-supported ideas, programs, or initiatives to improve education.

The important point, however, is to use hints and clues with all students to communicate that you have high expectations for the entire class. This helps build positive teacher-student relations. Tell Students They Have the Ability to Do Well Another way to communicate positive expectations to students is by directly telling them they have the ability to do well.

When you tell your students you have confidence that they can handle a difficult assignment or improve their behavior, you impart a very powerful message.

Students often will work hard and behave appropriately to prove that your confidence in them is justified. Every child needs to have at least one significant adult in his or her life who believes that he or she can do well.

Ideally, children would hear this from their parents, but the sad truth is that is not always the case. Teachers have the unique opportunity and privilege to communicate daily to a number of students that they believe in them. What a gift to be able to be that significant adult in even one student's life.

Using this strategy might lead a teacher to say this to a student: You've been working very hard on remembering to write down your thinking as you solve math problems, and I know you can transfer that skill to this test.A review of the research shows that authors have a lot to say about positive relationships with students.

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Thompson () says, “The most powerful weapon available to secondary teachers who want to foster a favorable learning climate is a positive relationship with our students” (p.

6). agreement conversations teachers and coaches have is about Continued on p. 2 Teacher-coach Coaching is most successful when instruction im-proves, student learning increases — and more teachers see relationship with teachers to make the process inviting, to listen deeply, to seek to understand teachers’ needs, and to.

CONFERENCE YEAR website maintained by LOCAL WEBMASTER CONTACT PERSON and Brad Sietz. website maintained by LOCAL WEBMASTER CONTACT PERSON and Brad Sietz. Sara Rimm-Kaufman, PhD, and Lia Sandilos, PhD, University of Virginia.

Improving students' relationships with teachers has important, positive and long-lasting implications for both students' academic and social development.

The benefits of instructional conversations in student teacher relationships

SEDL merged with the American Institutes for Research (AIR) on January 1, This archived website contains the work of SEDL legacy projects and . Barbara McCombs, PhD, University of Denver. This module takes into consideration the holistic nature of individual student learning and the most effective practices for helping them develop into autonomous and responsible learners.

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