Food and culture a cross cultural look at eating habits essay

Photo-Secession At the beginning of American modernism, photography still struggled to be recognized as a form of art. The photographer Alfred Stieglitz described it as: I could not understand why the artists should envy me for my work, yet, in the same breath, decry it because it was machine-made.

Food and culture a cross cultural look at eating habits essay

Received Nov 9; Accepted Feb Abstract In personalized nutrition, food is a tool for good health, implying an instrumental relationship between food and health. Food receives a secondary value, while health would appear to be a descriptive biological concept.

Food and culture a cross cultural look at eating habits essay

This article gives an introduction to cultural understandings of food and health. The wider definition of food and health is explored in relation to the commonly used scientific approach that tends to take a more reductionist approach to food and health. The different discourses on food and health are being discussed in relation to ethical aspects of personalized nutrition.

The success of personalized nutrition is likely dependent upon the ability to integrate the scientific approach with everyday cultural, emotional, ethical, and sensual understandings of food. Health theories can be divided into two principal rival types—biostatistical and holistic. Biostatistical focuses on survival, while holistic focuses on ability as a precondition for health.

Arguments in favor of a holistic and individualistic theory of health and illness are presented. It allows focus on individual health premises and related dietary means of health promotion, as well as an individualized perspective on the objectives of health promotion. An individualistic notion of health also indicates that people with high levels of vital goals benefit more easily.

To reach beyond these groups is likely difficult. This potential injustice should be balanced with global preventive medical programs. Consequently, in the context of personalized nutrition, food may be understood as a tool for good health.

This implies an instrumental relationship between food and health, where food is ascribed a secondary value and health appears to be a descriptive biological concept. However, food plays a more significant role in human life; food is connected to social contexts, cultural values, and identities.

Likewise, health is not necessarily a descriptive concept; it may be seen as instrumental in relation to individual life plans—a perspective that turns health into a more complex, value-laden concept. The different discourses on food and health are being discussed in relation to ethical aspects of personalized nutrition, leading to the following questions: What kind of ethical challenges may be identified for personalized nutrition in relation to concepts of food and health, which include cultural and value-laden aspects?

And how are social and cultural concepts of food and holistic concepts of health related to the aim of individualization in personalized nutrition? Scientific and cultural approaches to food The emergence and development of the life sciences has brought about changes in our understanding of nature and thus also of food.

The significant contribution of the life sciences to increased living standards and a safer appraisal of food in the Western world have been accompanied, though, by an intellectualization of our relationship to food Coffp.

Knowledge gained through the life sciences influences individual and cultural approaches to food and contributes to an increased intellectual and rational attitude toward food. For instance, information on labels of processed food packages has during the past decennia become more detailed and more explicitly related to health effects.

The consumer is in the grocery shop confronted with information on different labels, some indicating health effects. Food consumption and the choice of food products are thus affected not just by personal taste, availability, and cultural traditions, but also by life science knowledge available on labels.

Technological developments within food production, such as the development of novel foods, may be contrasted to cultural, social, ethical, and sensual relationships to food.

The rational attitude is practiced in many ways, among others through scientific mapping and analysis of chemical substances in food targeted at understanding and improving human health. Though there has long been interest in the interaction between food and health, it is known today that this interaction is characterized by complexity.

Ethnological perspectives on the role of food in human life illuminate different aspects of food, such as culture, relations, identity, and power. Food as culture Falk pointed out that the eating community and the meal are the basic foundation of all societies.

Hence, there is no culture without food. Food functions as a way to give structure to daily life and to ritualistically mark the passages from one formal life stage e.Discover the Greece Culture and Society in the Greek islands: Traditions, customs, religion, music, food, wine, music, products, recipes, cultural events and more.

Social Facebook Twitter caninariojana.com YouTube Flickr Pinterest LinkedIn Instagram. Mar 15,  · Food as culture. Falk pointed out that the eating community and the meal are the basic foundation of all caninariojana.com, there is no culture without food.

Food functions as a way to give structure to daily life and to ritualistically mark the passages from one formal life stage (e.g., eating cake at a wedding) or informal life stage (e.g., drinking a nightcap before bedtime) to another.

SCHEME OF WORK / 1 September / 13 comments. PRESENTATION NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL, BENIN CITY. SCHEME OF WORK FOR PHE. JSS 1. 1ST TERM. Definition, nature, scope and objectives of physical education. Eritrean Cultural Profile Author(s): Dorothy Cooper; Aisling Underwood; See documentation for details This idea may lead to overfeeding or unhealthy eating habits.

Education is needed about the health risks associated with being overweight or obese. These cultural practices regarding food and nutrition often translate to obesity and. the only furniture in the aqal. Nomads have few possessions, and each item has practical uses.

Cooking utensils, storage boxes, stools, woven mats, and water bags .

The Study of Food - Sidney Mintz

As a follow-up to Tuesday’s post about the majority-minority public schools in Oslo, the following brief account reports the latest statistics on the cultural enrichment of schools in Austria. Vienna is the most fully enriched location, and seems to be in roughly the same situation as Oslo.

Many thanks to Hermes for the translation from caninariojana.com

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